Origins of Renal Physiology at MDIBL Continues to Inspire Nephrology Fellows

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2017 MDIBL Origins of Renal Physiology National Renal Fellows Course

I first discovered the Origins of Renal Physiology course on Renal Fellow Network as a medicine intern, and ever since that time, dreamt of going to the course as a renal fellow. Nate’s picture in front of the “Kidney Shed” was seared in my mind. The dream finally came true two weeks ago when I set foot on the Mount Desert Island Biological Lab (MDIBL) in Coastal Maine, and the first place I visited was indeed the Kidney Shed.

In his opening address to the fellows attending the course, Dr. Ziedel rightly said “Physiology is the pride of Nephrology”. He went on to mention the names of several luminaries who have worked at the MDIBL leading to many important discoveries. The lab has been a cornerstone of nephrology research and has been a home for the work of Homer Smith, E.K Marshall, David Evans, Franklin Epstein, and many others who have spent years working on and elucidating the fundamental concepts on kidney physiology.

In modern day practice of nephrology, we are less exposed to these fundamentals of kidney physiology that initially piqued our interest in nephrology. The Origins course is one of the many efforts made by the renal community to reconnect nephrolgoy fellows to physiology. It’s a very unique course which gives the fellows an opportunity to rub elbows with senior and distinguished renal physiologists from esteemed institutions and work with them on experiments to understand the different aspects of kidney biology.

The course consisted of 7 modules, each focusing on a functional unit of the nephron- the glomerulus, proximal tubule, thick ascending limb, distal tubule, acid-base, water homeostasis, and chloride secretion. We studied animals like zebrafish, turtles, and toad bladders. We also explored how ENaC and NKCC channels work. We delved into discussion about morpholinos and so much more. Over the duration of the course, we developed a new-found appreciation for the beauty and wonder of exploring how the kidney regulates homeostasis. We also got a sense for the profound impact MDIBL has had on the field of nephrology and physiology.

As MDIBL is in such close proximity to Acadia National Park– one of the most beautiful national parks in the world, nature is inherently embedded in the process of learning here. Most days started off with a refreshing early morning short hike which energized us to spend the entire day in the lab. On alternate days, amazing outdoor activities were planned for us after presentations of the earlier day’s work.

My week at the MDIBL during this course was very memorable.

I was honored to be working closely with great mentors and met nephrology fellows from all over the US and abroad, shared interests and future aspirations and found new friends. 

All in all, an incredible experience! I would wholeheartedly endorse this conference for future fellows.

Manasi Bapat

@manasib33
2nd year Nephrology Fellow

Mount Sinai Hospital, NY

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